Portrait no.17

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17 of 26 Modern computer technology has been a game changer for people with motor neurone disease. It enables those paralysed by the disease to continue to communicate and control their environment (turning on lights, closing curtains etc) and even to move around by using their eye movements and any other small bodily movement they may have left. Adam Waites is Head of Assessment for Smartbox Assistive Technology, a company that creates assistive technology solutions, helping people with disabilities to do things that everyone else takes for granted. We interviewed Adam in October 2016. “To control a computer with your eyes using “Eye Gaze” technology you have two infrared emitters either side of a computer screen and a camera underneath in the middle. Those infrared emitters create a glint in the surface of the eye. The camera is then able to see where you are “eye pointing” on the screen. So fundamentally your “Eye Gaze” then becomes a glorified mouse and you can control a computer just like using any other cursor. There was a niche in the market when Smartbox first started that no-one was really addressing which was to adapt a computer as a communication aid. Paul Hawes who founded Smartbox couldn’t understand why the assistive technology companies that were out there weren’t using computers. Those guys that made dedicated devices and were the only options ten years ago then missed the boat. We came in and took that market share and were seen as being forward thinking. We use “One size fits one” as our catchphrase when people ask “what’s the best thing?”. Our response often is “well that’s not an easy question to answer because it depends on you”. People’s communication aids are becoming more and more personalised – less generic and more about the user. So we’re seeing lots of interest in voice banking now. People who are losing their voice record and bank it and then have their own voice synthesised. There are also now a couple of teams around the world exploring Eye Gaze driving. There are some safety issues with that, but there has been some success!” . https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/26miles4mnd

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Portrait no.16

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16 of 26. In February 2000 Sarah Ezekiel noticed some weakness in her left arm. Two months later she was given a diagnosis of ALS. Now she can only move her eyes and uses Tobii EyeGaze technology to communicate via her computer. The technology tracks her eye movements and reflects an infrared beam that acts as a cursor onto an adapted PC screen. She also uses it to create EyeGaze artwork that has been exhibited around the world. “I was thirty-four and pregnant with my second child and mentioned my symptoms at an antenatal appointment. When they referred me to a neurologist I was surprised. I thought that my symptoms were related to my pregnancy somehow. I didn’t know what motor neurone disease was. They told me to bring someone with me for my diagnosis. My husband came but he got fed up of waiting and left. So I was alone being told this most terrible news. But I’m glad now because I was able to take in the information undisturbed. I just remember thinking ‘how will I look after my children?’ My marriage collapsed as I became progressively disabled. I couldn't physically care for my children or myself anymore, and I spiralled into deep depression. But I pulled myself up from rock bottom and now see MND as a window of opportunity. I don’t think I would have done much with my life if I didn’t get ill. It hasn’t been easy and I still get low and have difficult times. But I’ve survived a long time and achieved more than I could have expected. I’m enjoying being an artist. I don’t think I would change anything if I could”. . To help support the work of the Motor Neurone Disease Association, please donate here: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/26miles4mnd #MND #ALS #running #marathon #Tallinn #motorneuronedisease #Tallinnmarathon

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Portrait no. 13

 

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13 of 26. Paula Maguire – champion fundraiser. Paula Maguire was crowned Fundraiser of the Year at the ITV Pride of Britain Awards in 2015 after personally raising four million twenty-seven thousand pounds and starting the ALS/MND Ice Bucket Challenge in the UK. “In June 2009 my uncle Stuart was diagnosed with motor neurone disease. At that time I’d heard of it but couldn’t have told you what it was and none of my family had even heard of it. Then only nine weeks later he died. At that point we were all still coming to terms with what MND was and what it would mean and how it would affect him. It was so very, very quick. The day after he died I decided that people needed to know what MND is because of how devastating it was and the fact it’s terminal and no one actually knew about it. I thought, money aside, we needed to raise awareness. People would ask how he died and you’d explain he had motor neurone disease and every time you had to got through the whole back story of what MND is. I used to watch my Auntie going through that and I thought to myself she shouldn’t have to explain all the time. People should just be aware of what it is. So I’ve now done 7 Great North Runs, 2 Great Yorkshire runs, a Great South Run, the Leeds half marathon. I’ve also jumped out of planes, abseiled down a viaduct in Derbyshire, done Tough Mudders, jumped in the sea on Boxing Day. There’s lots and lots I’ve done but there’s still lots I want to do as well to keep trying to raise awareness". ___________________________________________ Help find an effective treatment for MND by donating here: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/26miles4mnd #MND #ALS #running #marathon #Tallinn #motorneuronedisease

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