Portrait no.8

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8 of 26. Michael Wenham. Michael Wenham worked as an English teacher before training as a vicar. For many years he was the vicar of three village churches in Oxfordshire before MND caused him to retire. He’s been living with the primary lateral sclerosis form of motor neurone disease for more than eighteen years. A journal written throughout his illness has been turned into a book called “My Donkey Body”. It tracks the despair he’s felt at times as his body gives up, and the darkness that descends as his mind feels trapped. “I didn’t want to preach, nor give false comfort. I just wanted to say this is a bit what it’s like. It’s pretty awful. But it’s not all darkness. I feel grateful, apprehensive and occasionally very tired! The worst thing about living with PLS is the frustration and its prolonged nature. The good thing is being forced off the treadmill of activity. My consultant is right – There are pluses and minuses about living with PLS as opposed to ALS – It's a long haul living with PLS.” www.justgiving.com/fundraising/26miles4mnd #mnd #pls #als #PrimaryLateralSclerosis #running #TallinnMarathon

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“keep on going like a Duracell battery”

Actress Gina Bellman whose mum has MND

Cristian and I have taken another 6 portraits which gets us very close to the final 26!

When we started the project Sarah Ezekiel (who you’ll remember from my last post) suggested we had to include actress Gina Bellman in our 26 Miles portraits. Gina became a household name in 1989 for her performance as the title role in Dennis Potter’s drama “Blackeyes”. She’s also well-known as Jane in the sitcom “Coupling” and for acting alongside James Nesbitt in the BBC drama Jekyll. Over in the States she has a huge fan following from her role as Sophie Devereaux on the TNT television series Leverage.

Gina’s mother has the rare primary lateral sclerosis variant of MND that I’ve been diagnosed with.

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Gina’s mum on a recent family outing

In a weird way getting Primary Lateral sclerosis (PLS) is equivalent to winning the MND lottery because it’s the rarest of the 4 or 5 different subtypes. The disease usually develops very slowly and is unlikely to cause us to die. PLS can develop into ALS but most patients lead long (but increasingly disabled) lives.

I’ve heard it said that some in the “MND community” say the lucky MND patients are the ones who go early. I really disagree and think that every person we have met in the 14 months doing this project would too.

Yes it’s rubbish being ill – Attempting to do the simplest of tasks now leaves me worn out for the rest of the day, I find it increasingly difficult to walk and have to use a scooter to get around. It makes me depressed if I let it BUT the damaged motor neurones causing my body to “not work” are not me! I’m still as stubborn and determined as I was 10 years ago. In fact I’m probably more so since developing MND.

Gina says something similar about her mum:

“In a way the MND makes her even more determined to be independent than if she was a perfectly healthy 81-year-old. None of us expected her to keep going like a Duracell battery…other people in my mum’s friend group have died of age related diseases but mum’s still going strong, being stubborn, being independent.”

Please click to go to our Just Giving page or text to donate so that the MND Association can help more of us stubborn MND patients remain independent. Text ‘mmnd99 £5.00‘ (or whatever you can afford) to 70070.

There will be more about Gina and her mum when we publish the portrait Cristian took of us in her lovely Kensington garden. That will be during the 26 days leading up to Cristian’s marathon run.

For the time being here are some snaps “behind the scenes” of the shoot.

(Click on the first photo to view in a lightbox)

 

Why do “You Keep Me Hanging On”?

We’ve been sent a message by a follower of our twentysixmiles blog. He said why do “you keep me hanging on” Miles? What happened to the portrait shoot with Kim Wilde?

The shoot was in October and it’s true, we’ve not published a post about it yet. The sad fact is that a few days after the photography Miles’s wife told him she wanted them to separate. Sadly the stress of living with MND has (at least in part) made Miles’s marriage another victim of this wretched disease.

This is why we’ve got behind with our marathon photo project, but like all true charity marathon runners we will get to the finish – and  we’re “Another Step Closer” to the finishing line with this post because… just for you Terry Brown (and all the many other Kim Wilde fans out there), here are some “behind the scenes” photos from our portrait shoot with Kim taken at her beautiful house in Hertfordshire last October. (Click on the first image to enter the gallery).

 

The main portrait of Kim and Miles will be published on 26Miles4MND once we’ve confirmed the date of Cristian’s marathon run.

Don’t forget, although we are having fun creating the 26Miles4MND project, and we hope you are having fun following the journey, it’s all about raising money for the only national charity in England, Wales and Northern Ireland for people with motor neurone disease.

  • A person’s lifetime risk of developing MND is up to 1 in 400. That’s one person in an average size cinema screen.
  • Motor neurone disease kills a third of people within a year and more than half within two years of diagnosis.
  • MND can leave people locked in a failing body, unable to move, talk, swallow and eventually breathe.

So it’s a deadly serious thing. If you’d like to help us raise money for the Motor Neurone Disease Association, click here to go to our Just Giving site or you can donate via your mobile phone – Text ‘mmnd99 £5.00‘ (or whatever you can afford) to 70070 

Any amount of money helps and will be greatly appreciated by everybody who has to live with this awful, cruel disease.

Thank you.

“The brain is plastic…..”

If this 26Miles4MND marathon fundraising project was a real, human entrant in the London marathon, it would be in a pantomime horse outfit, dodging London traffic, only half finished two weeks after the race was officially over.

Sorry. I’ve got no excuse – I’ve just had a ton of stuff going on in my personal life and Cristian has been inundated with photographic work.

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Climbing the wall….

So we seemed to have hit a wall of the sort marathon runners (apparently) experience, but we’re teetering at the summit and are about to come down the other side. Recently we took another portrait and more are in the pipeline.

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A few days ago we interviewed and photographed the formidable Professor Karen Morrison (pictured above with Cristian). She is my neurology consultant and the person who diagnosed me as having a variant of motor neurone disease back in 2013.

The pictured “plastic brain” was used as a prop in her portrait. I’d definitely count her as one of the most intelligent people that I’ve ever met. She really is quite awe inspiring –

Professor Morrison trained at both Oxford and Cambridge universities, also trained in America and once spent time amongst Inuit people living in their traditional accommodation – again as part of the journey  to being one of the foremost experts on motor neurone disease in the UK.

….Whilst chatting to her and hearing the fascinating information about her life, I also found out that my joke about brains being “plastic in real life too”, is something she’s heard many, many times before. I think she actually shook her head in disbelief when I said it. Brains are plastic though – look it up if you don’t believe me 😉

Here are some photos of one great brain and some others doing what they do best – hanging around pointing cameras at people. There’s also a sneak preview of what the finished portrait could be like if you click on the pictures and look closely.

I’ll be writing more about Professor Morrison and why she chose to specialise in neurology and motor neurone disease in particular when we publish the 26 portraits in the month leading up to Cristian’s marathon.

  • In case you’d forgotten, or this is your first time here, 26Miles4MND is a marathon portrait photography project being undertaken by the editorial photographer Cristian Barnett and his close friend Miles Pilling (who happens to have a type of MND).
  • We are taking 26 portraits of people who’s lives are / have been affected by motor neurone disease. Cristian has persuaded me to be in each of the portraits alongside every subject. They are all being shot in a similar unique style.
  • Cristian will be running a marathon once all the portraits have been taken.
  • On each of 26 days leading up to the marathon, we will publish one of his photographic portraits and a brief piece of writing to accompany it.
  • So there will be 26 pictures of Miles alongside the individuals that we have persuaded to take part and Cristian will be running 26 miles. Hence: 26miles4mnd
  • We have also persuaded some household names with links to Miles in his former life at the BBC and beyond to be photographed. These portraits will be separate from the other 26 and will hopefully help to raise awareness in what we are trying to achieve. Keep in touch with the project at @26miles4mnd or https://www.facebook.com/26miles4MND or bookmark this website to see their photos when we publish them.

We’ve already raised just under a thousand pounds. Our target is two thousand six hundred. The money people have kindly donated so far has already gone to the Motor Neurone Disease Association.

Our hope is that during the 26 days leading up to Cristian’s heroic marathon attempt, people around the web and also in the real world will become interested, start talking and sharing about the project and the money will start to flow in. It would be absolutely fantastic to make more than our target figure.

If you’d like to help us achieve that, here is the link to our donation page again, or you can donate via your mobile phone – Text ‘mmnd99 £5.00‘ (or whatever you can afford) to 70070 

Thanks for reading 🙂

A meeting of the MND lottery winners club

Today I was at a meeting of the MND lottery winners club – but nobody was celebrating.

That’s because the patient delegates at the first ever UK PLS Day used up their share of luck developing the rarest type of motor neurone disease – PLS, and not in winning life changing amounts of money.

Developing Primary Lateral Sclerosis is very life changing though. In extreme cases, it can leave people virtually paralysed and unable to do the most basic things for themselves. It can be considered a benign form of MND as it’s almost unheard of for patients to die because of it. However, for carers it could be seen as a life sentence….a sweet but sour mix of still having your loved one with you, but in a diminished and increasingly helpless form.

Still, we are the lucky ones, and here we were. For some it was an emotional opportunity to meet others living with the same condition. I remember when Neicey Mann let me into her home when I visited with Cristian to take her portrait, I was nearly brought to tears because I recognised in her the same struggles and difficulties that I had. Until then it had felt like the loneliest illness on earth.

Members of our Facebook PLS support group with Neicey at the front.

We are very lucky to live in the age of the internet so that those of us with rare conditions can find others to talk to. Neicey set up a Facebook group just for PLS patients and their carers and it now has 413 members worldwide! That’s more than on any medical database and Neicey has been told that she probably knows more than any neurologists about the day-to-day symptoms we all share – She might one day even write a paper about us!

It was great to meet up with some of the people who we have photographed and interviewed for the 26 Miles 4 MND fundraising project again. Here are some more pictures of what was an interesting and informative day organised by the Oxford MND Centre and the Motor Neurone Disease Association…and actually, there was even a little bit of celebrating going on!

Professor Martin Turner (who we have photographed for 26 Miles 4 MND) and Professor Olaf Ansorge.

Michael Wenham and his wife Jane

Dr Mary-Kay Floeter talking, a world expert on PLS, who had come all the way from Washington in the US

We have to thank the Motor Neurone Disease Association for providing a lot of the funding for days like the one we enjoyed today.

Motor Neurone Disease is not as rare as you might think: In 2012, 1 out of every 232 people who died in England had motor neurone disease.

If you’d like to help find treatments and a future cure for all the types of motor neurone disease, click here for the “26 Miles” Just Giving page. Any amount, however large or small, will be greatly appreciated. 

Or donate via your mobile phone! – Text ‘mmnd99 £5.00‘ (or whatever you can afford) to 70070

Thank you 🙂

A big day for the small guy of MND diseases

Big day tomorrow – The first ever UK PLS Day is being held in Oxford!

Click here for info.

– Primary Lateral Sclerosis is one of the rarer forms of motor neurone disease.

It’s a big event for those of us who have been told we have PLS. Most of us find health professionals have to look it up on the internet because they’ve never heard of it so any publicity is good publicity as they say!

For more info (very little more unfortunately) about this little understood form of MND click here!

An emotional real life meeting for the couple who met on the internet!

I met Neicey Mann online and sent her a message one evening asking if we could meet in person so I could photograph her….. Being a well brought up lady, she would normally have refused point-blank and told me where to get off, but the photos were the first of our “26 Miles” pictures – the beginning of Cristian’s and my campaign to raise money for the Motor Neurone Disease Association.

Miles and Neicey

Neicey runs a Facebook support group for people who live with PLS (or primary lateral sclerosis), which is the type of MND I was diagnosed with. You have to live with PLS or be a carer of someone with it to join, so whatever is said there feels private and in the 2 years that I’ve been a part of it, the group’s been a great source of comfort to me and also the cause of a lot of laughter! As you can see when I met Neicey in person the laughs continued.

Neicey is a nickname that was given to “Denise” – Neicey’s real name – by her friends when she was a kid and it stuck. She’s a Brummie through and through and wanted to set up a support group for this “rare” type of MND where people could support each other, ask personal questions and have a laugh as well.

When I was invited into Neicey’s real home, I felt very emotional as it was the first time I’d met somebody else with my type of MND – I recognised she had PLS straight away, and so did Cristian – she was walking and moving in just the same crooked, awkward and stiff way as me!

cdAs Neicey’s symptoms first began to affect her, she was a singer in a band and had a CD released called “Decree Neicey” – shortly after getting divorced. Sadly she’s had to give up singing because of how much MND has weakened her voice. She’s also lost the strength to play the guitar.

She seems to be a pure extrovert (which is probably why she enjoyed performing so much) – I interviewed Neicey whilst Cristian set up his photographic gear and, I’m sure she won’t mind me saying, it was hard for me to get a word in edgeways! We both enjoyed ourselves immensely in the couple of hours that we spent with Neicey and I hope she did too. I feel as though our virtual friendship has become a real world one now!

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Here are some more shots that I took as Cristian was doing his photography thing. I hope you enjoy them.

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When we start publishing Cristian’s “26 Miles” portraits in the 26 days before his marathon fundraising run, there will be a “Personal MND story” accompanying each picture, where you can find out more about the person in the photograph and of how motor neurone disease has altered their life.

Please help us to reach our target of £2,600 for the Motor Neurone Disease AssociationThe MND Association is the only national charity in England, Wales and Northern Ireland focused on MND care, research and campaigning and is the charity “26 Miles” is fundraising for. Please help them to help more people affected by MND by DONATING to our Just Giving page or donate via your mobile phone – Text ‘mmnd99 £5.00‘ (or whatever you can afford) to 70070 

Thank you 🙂